Another country, another language to learn, another nanny to get used to.  Every time his father’s oil company moved them it was the same routine leaving his friends, leaving the household staff that he’d finally connected with to start anew.

Micha was the only son of James and Sarah Cohen.  A twelve year old boy like any other twelve year old boy, he’d spent much of his young life growing up in Arlington Virginia, a suburb of Washington DC in the United States.  His father James worked for Trilium one of the world’s largest producers of oil as a government lobbyist.  His mother Sarah an aspiring author, she’d written for years without getting much published other than the occasional short story, while at the same time staying very involved in local charitable cause.

They’d lived in house on Steeplechase Lane for as long as Micha could remember, a fantastic Civil War error home set back from the road on a cul de sac.  But on his eighth birthday that all changed, they were moving, not moving down the street, not to Dallas, Texas where his father company was headquarters but to London England.  That was 3,666 miles away.  3,666 miles from everything he’d ever known, from his friend, his school, his soccer.  I mean they didn’t even call it soccer there.  They called it Football!  

His parents made it seem like an adventure, a great opportunity to live in new and excite place, to make new friends and experience a new culture first hand.  Since then they had moved every two years first to Germany and now they we’re moving to Japan.  In each move he’d adjusted quickly, made new friends and been able to keep in touch with old ones through online games like Minecraft and using his iphone or ipad with FaceTime.  Lately they’d begun using Snapchat and Instagram to connect and share with each other.  While his parents weren’t big fans of all the “screentime”, they knew it was hard on Micha and if he could stay connected with his friends then it couldn’t all be bad as long as the usage wasn’t overused.

While Micha wasn’t a fan of moving yet again, it would be the third time in four years, he didn’t have much of a choice so he’d have to make the best of it.  He began to daydream about their new home,  his new room,  and the new friends he’s make.  

Would there be a club soccer team for him to join and would he be good enough to play?  He began playing soccer at the age of four at the local YMCA in Arlington, and continued to play everywhere the family moved.  Soccer was one of the things that made it easy for him to adjust.  He was a very talented player, fast, good with both feet and a strong left foot shot made him a good striker.  Just then a knock at his bedroom door startled him from his daydream.

“Come in” said Micha

It was Sarah his mom, she’d just returned from Japan where Micha’s father and her we’re looking for a new home and a new nanny to help them adjust.  They’d always had help in their home, with his father traveling for Trllium and his mom’s involvement in local charitable causes Micha had become accustomed to having a nanny.  Someone to help get him off to school, help with his homework and most important be the first friend he made in each new country.

She at down on his bed where he was laying looking out the window daydreaming.

“I wanted show you some pictures of the new house, they call it “uchi” and here’s the pool, “puru”, the garden “karesansui”, and the best part, we met some of the new neighbors a few of the families have kids your age and one family is originally from the states San Francisco to be exact, they have a twelve year old son name Andy who goes to your new school so he can show you the ropes.  You’re going to like it there she exclaimed”  

As she got up to leave she said “would you like to have a little farewell party to say so long to all of your friends.  We could do it next Saturday so long as you’re packed and ready to go.”

“Sure that sounds like awesome, I’ll invite everyone.”   Micha jumped off his bed to grab his iphone and within seconds the invite was on Snapchat for all his friends to comment on.